Fun With Re-Amping

So, a few weeks ago we recorded Mr. Chuck West performing this awesome song called ‘Don’t Taze Me Bro’.
Our final assignment included a requirement for re-amping. I could have done this in the audio lab, but our professor told us a rather inspiring story of someone who re-amped something last year inside of a mailbox. So I thought of the most random places and ways I could re-amp things, and I gave it a go.

I initially tried my Blue Yeti in the dryer with my phone. But not even Snuggles dryer sheets could make that sound squeezably soft...or salvagable for that matter.

I initially tried my Blue Yeti in the dryer with my phone. But not even Snuggles dryer sheets could make that sound squeezably soft…or salvageable for that matter.

For the vocal and harmonica track, I set up 5 empty water bottles and one half empty one. (Who says I don’t recycle?) I set a Zoom H4n on top of the bottles and set my iPhone playing the track in between the bottles. Finally, I put a plastic trash bin over the top of all of it. I enjoyed the result. As the song is a subliminal jab at the feds, it felt the megaphone sound it ended up producing on his voice was fitting.

Zoom recorder on top of (mostly) empty water bottles. Please always recycle.

Zoom recorder on top of (mostly) empty water bottles. Please always recycle.

I wanted to do something with the guitar track, and I had this great idea of putting the Zoom and my phone in a plastic container and putting it underwater. However, all my plastic containers had poor watertight integrity, and I couldn’t afford to buy Media Loan a new recorder. So I instead chose a glass jar. I began with the recorder and phone in the jar alone (Ha. I made a rhyme.) but decided to add a microfiber glove since the initial results were overbearing. I liked the results because in addition to the guitar, the glass gave off a weird whistling sound.

This jar is amazing for lemonade. It's also great for getting the weird sounds out of guitar tracks.

This jar is amazing for lemonade. It’s also great for getting the weird sounds out of guitar tracks.

I don’t think the end product was the greatest, but it definitely got me re-amped (no pun intended) about continuing on to our sound design for film units next quarter.

Til next time!

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